Reasons to be Cheerful about Undiagnosed Children’s Day #UCDsuperhero

My daughter is undiagnosed. She is no longer a child in age, but I still feel a bond with all those families who are wondering why their child is different and desperately searching for answers. The current thinking among some disability communities is that you should just look at your own child and ignore labels, but that presupposes that every parent knows what to do when faced with a barrage of unexpected medical, physical, intellectual, behavioural, and sensory differences. Most parents struggle at times with their typical children, and few would criticise them for consulting parenting books and media experts for help. So it’s surely understandable that when you have a disabled child, you want answers, you want a diagnosis, you want a roadmap, you want tailored advice, and you want to find your parenting tribe. And today is Undiagnosed Children’s Day to raise awareness of the additional unique challenges of raising a child with no diagnosis.

I’m still searching for a diagnosis and I enrolled my daughter  in the DDD project a few years ago. No answers yet. But it’s not something that really worries me at this stage. I’ve learned that you cannot predict the future, no matter how much information you have, or how hard you try to control it. I’ve also learned that no manual or advice will ever be guaranteed to help your child, even when they do have a diagnosis. I know how hard it is, but it will be easier if you can find a way to let go of your expectations and go with the flow instead. My daughter is proof that life goes on and can be wonderful too.

While my daughter has severe to profound physical and intellectual difficulties, she is healthy and happy once her needs are met. She’s a joy to be around, and has found her place among a group of more able young adults in a day programme nearby. She has a busy life in the community at weekends.

Thanks to the much maligned Facebook, I have a big network of other parents living similar lives to myself, some with sons and daughters a little like mine. We face similar challenges and can support and advise each other. There is an organisation for families living with an undiagnosed child called SWAN UK (open to families in Ireland too) and it also provides help, resources, support and a community. So you could say that we’ve both found our tribe too.

21 years after that tiny 875 gram preemie baby took her first breath, she is very much alive and loving life and spreading happiness all round her, and despite the lack of a diagnosis, I am now confident that I can meet her needs, once she and I get enough support. So many of my worries about her have been melted away by her beautiful smiles. She really is a #UCDsuperhero and that’s my reason to be cheerful for this week.

Undiagnosed Children's Day 2018
More reasons to be cheerful over at Lakes Single Mum.

 

 

 

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8 thoughts on “Reasons to be Cheerful about Undiagnosed Children’s Day #UCDsuperhero

  1. I always love to see your daughter’s gorgeous smile. She smiles from her toes up. And I completely agree about FB… for all the bad press it gets, I’d be lost without it too xxx

    Liked by 1 person

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