If it works for dead saints, why not for me?

I can remember the years when my pillow really did smile at me. My bedroom was a cool, calm and comfy place. Going to bed meant climbing in, curling up and dropping off. Of course nights with the children usually meant that I was up and down like a Jack in the Box, but I sank into sleep every time my head hit the pillow.

Insomnia is a rare visitor here, like a wasp on a winter’s day. Even during the worst of the menopausal years I mostly slept, but not the recommended eight hours of sleep. It’s partly my own fault. After I left home, there was so much to do and see, so many people to meet, so much to experience and enjoy, that sleep just seemed like a waste of precious time. At College I would be up at 8am studying or swimming, in lectures at 9, manning the Rag Office at lunchtime, working in a bar in the evening, then on to a club followed by curry and home to bed at 4. Then I’d get up at 8 and do it all again…

I *may* have slowed down a bit as I’ve got older. But my children’s night time needs resulted in constant interruptions over the past 25 years anyway. Things were improving though, until this year. The crisis affecting my youngest has had some unpleasant consequences for me (as well as for him obviously, but I don’t write about him on here) and today is the anniversary of when it all began to go wrong. At first I thought the problem would be solved in a few weeks, then by the New Year, but a disastrous Christmas sent everything spiralling downwards, and I now feel trapped and traumatised in a very difficult situation with no good options, and nothing seems to be working.

I’ve been finding it hard to talk, to eat, to function, and also to sleep. The novelty of sleeping in the kitchen has long since worn off, though moving out of my lovely bedroom to sleep downstairs has worked out well for my disabled daughter. As for me, I now know every peculiar sound that fridges make in the middle of the night! And I’m also too accessible, as my sleeping corner is on the way to the shower room. This now means regular night time disturbances.

With these on top of all the other stressors, I ended up with night terrors so bad I would often lie awake from 2am, barely fit to cope the next day. Finally I went to my GP for help in August, and reluctantly went back on meds. A sticking plaster over a wound the system seems powerless to heal.

Something, possibly the bed, also led to trapped nerves in my neck and shoulder. As part of the solution I was told to stop curling up, and to sleep unprotected on my back. Ugh. I feel like a dead saint in a tomb. But if it works for them, I guess I’ll have to make it work for me.

And yes the meds plus the Calm app mean I am now sleeping a little bit better. But this can’t go on. Something has to change. After all, I’m not a saint, and I’m not dead either.

 

 

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5 thoughts on “If it works for dead saints, why not for me?

  1. Lack of sleep can affect absolutely everything else in your life………..or certainly how you can cope with everything in your life! I’ve struggled with sleep due to pain issues for many years now and my tolerance levels were at zero. But when I was put on meds to help with my sleep (even though adjustment was hard and I still 28 month later have a meds hangover each morning……….when I am able to function I am much more tolerant and capable to deal with pain issues and anything else……..NEVER underestimate the power a decent night sleep can have x

    Liked by 1 person

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