The things they don’t tell you about disability: Osteoporosis

Once upon a time, my beautiful disabled daughter could stand straight and small in a tiny stander that looked suspiciously like torture equipment, but didn’t bother her at all.

Smiley 8 Stander standing

As the years went by, Bs legs began to stiffen and bend, and despite daily stretching for more than 20 years, they will no longer straighten.

But when she stopped using the stander, she enjoyed using a walker until she outgrew that too and no suitable replacement could be found: disability equipment is mostly made in standard sizes and designs, and my daughter is not ‘standard’ in any way!

I was disappointed as I always believed that sitting in a chair all day is not good for anyone, including people with physical disabilities, so she got daily floor time, and swimming as often as it could be organised.

However I’d forgotten one thing: the importance of weight bearing (though seriously, why is knowing everything my responsibility???) and when a DEXA scan to measure her bone density was ordered, I thought nothing of it.

It turns out that medication for seizures combined with inactivity put her at high risk for… osteoporosis. I thought it was an old person’s disease, but my darling daughter has been diagnosed with the condition, aged just 22.

So now she needs to take calcium and vitamin D and I have another urgent task: to get another stander and walker for her as soon as possible.

 

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5 thoughts on “The things they don’t tell you about disability: Osteoporosis

  1. Candi,

    I also thought osteoporosis was a condition that affected only old people — my mother had it, and my cousin Naomi has it. Hopefully the supplements and the stander and walker will hold it in check. B is in very good hands.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Bless you both, I hope you get the stander and walker you need without much issues. Exactly, how are you to know about everything! You are doing your best, B is in the best hands possible xx

    Like

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